All posts by Nate Joy

About Nate Joy

Nate is the Co-founder and Owner along with his wife Terra. Nate joined the team full-time in Spring 2017 with 10+ years of Project Management/Business Analysis experience. He works with clients on process improvement and software implementation.

Managing the Small (but Critical) Pieces of Your Business: The W9/1099 Dance

As a small business owner, there are so many ‘small’ things to keep track of with ‘large’ consequences attached if you drop the ball (or simply aren’t aware of a particular requirement). At Joy Accounting, we have expertise in these requirements so that you can focus on what you are good at – building your business – while we take care of the details that ensure your company hums along smoothly (and without unexpected calls from the IRS!).  Today’s post on the ‘W9/1099 dance’ is from Adrienne Kaylor, Lead Accountant at Joy Accounting. Enjoy!

What You Need to Know for the W9/1099 Dance

As accountants, part of our job is to be sure we track the many moving parts related to running a business. Often, business owners are doing their best to keep up with the important items, and invariably some of the smaller pieces get lost in the shuffle. Collecting W9 forms from vendors definitely falls into this “smaller pieces” category. However, if you are facing a fine for not properly issuing 1099’s to your vendors, it will seem anything but small!

So why are W9’s so important? Because they are necessary to obtain the correct information for you to properly issue a 1099 to certain vendors at year end. The 1099 is also submitted to the IRS, which then uses it to track income for each Tax Payer Identification Number (i.e. SSN for individual/sole proprietor or FEIN for LLC/Corporation/Partnership). If your vendor reports income received from you, but you did not submit a 1099 to the IRS, you could potentially face fines.

As of 2017, the IRS requires 1099’s to be issued for payments equal to or exceeding threshold of $600 during the year. Ideally, you would get the W9 form before issuing your first payment to the vendor, even if it’s less than $600. This is because you may pay that vendor again, later in the year, putting the amount over the $600 threshold.

The most common are independent contractors (such as marketing professionals, accountants, web designers, etc), lawyers, and rent to landlords. Payments that do not require a 1099 include merchandise, utilities, freight, or rent made to a real estate agent. Generally, the IRS does not require you issue a 1099 to a vendor if it is a corporation. Before you issue 1099’s, it’s always best to check directly with the IRS to brush up on the most recent requirements, in case there are recent changes.

If you are a business owner who wants to get these small (but critical) items off of your plate, it may be time to enlist some help from a specialist like Joy Accounting Services!

 

 

 

No More Feeling Out of Control (Part 2): What Kind of Accounting Help Do You Need?

Many businesses come to the realization that they need a Bookkeeper to keep their books in order on a weekly, monthly, or quarterly basis. And in many cases, a traditional bookkeeping service may be exactly what is needed. But did you realize that an accounting service could provide so much more than just maintenance of your day-to-day finances?

In Part 1 of this series, we discuss when you, as a small business owner, need to seek outside accounting help. But that only gets you part of the way. What considerations are important when selecting a bookkeeping service.

First, let’s take a brief look at the first two questions posed in the previous post and discuss how the answers could illuminate what kind of help you need.

  • Are your goalposts visible? This question relates to the strategic pillar of your business. If the answer is “No, I’m just trying to survive day to day,” then you likely need more than just basic bookkeeping help; you may need help defining your vision and aligning your tactics to that vision.
  • Do you feel out of control? This relates to your day-to-day, or operational, reality. If the answer is “yes”, or you don’t feel like you are spending time on the ‘right’ things in order to make your business successful, then you may need more than a traditional bookkeeper; someone who can 1) determine the root causes and suggest fixes, and 2) manage the day-to-day reality of your business, and 3) continually ensure that you are aligned to the vision that you’ve set (see the previous question).

If your goals are clear, you are tracking successfully towards them, and you are spending your time on the right things, then a ‘basic’ bookkeeping service may be exactly what you need (see options 1 and 2 below). Otherwise, you may lean towards something more comprehensive (see option 3 defined below).

What are Your Options?

Option 1 – Basic Support from Any Quality Bookkeeping Service

Opting for basic support from any qualified bookkeeping service is certainly a step in the right direction. Any good bookkeeper will be able to keep your books in order, manage payroll, and keep track of miscellaneous items such as quarterly tax preparation. This will be the cheapest of the three, but you’ll also receive the least value.

The downside of obtaining help from ‘any qualified bookkeeper’ is that every industry is unique and different. Being able to speak the language of your particular industry (or other niche) is an important, and often critical, component of being able to provide great service. In general, many people fail to understand the variance from industry to industry in accounting by assuming that ‘accounting is accounting’.

While getting help from any qualified bookkeeper is better than no help at all, we caution you against bookkeeping companies that take any and all clients that come their way. No one bookkeeping company can do it all, and going with a firm that takes every type of client likely means you’ll miss out on some personalized service that you could get with an expert.

Option 2 – Basic Support from an Expert

The ‘expert’ part is the critical element that differentiates options 1 and 2. An expert will know the right questions to ask the CPA. An expert will understand your business and should be able to point out any pitfalls with your current process or data.

Think of it this way – would you hire someone internally to your team that didn’t understand your business? Although they are not an internal employee, you need to apply the same standards to any outside resource that you would to an internal employee.

At Joy Accounting, we focus primarily on construction, trade-related industries, real estate, and other similar industries. Time and time again our clients have seen how much value we add because we understand our industries.

Take construction as an example. We know the construction apps that sync with QuickBooks Online, we understand the monthly cadence of a general contractor, and we understand the types of reporting needed to show how successful a construction business is.

The specifics of what is considered ‘basic’ support certainly will vary, but as a general concept it’s anything that doesn’t touch on the strategic elements of your business. A bookkeeper that performs the basics simply ensures that the books are balanced and the other assigned tasks within scope are completed. Of course, good bookkeeping companies will be able to flag issues and concerns, but they won’t necessarily impact, guide, or help track any of the strategic elements of your business.

Finding a true expert on your business (option 2) will likely be more expensive than finding a general bookkeeping service (option 1), as you are paying more for expertise. But in the long run, finding and hiring an expert will pay for that difference many times over.

Option 3 – From Strategy to Execution: The Entire Package

In our experience at Joy Accounting, we’ve seen that most small businesses need more than the basics; they need a partner who understands the company’s ‘True North’ and can help guide it in the right direction. They need a partner on the strategic level who can also help execute the strategy.

Mid-sized and large companies have the benefit of having access to all levels of accounting, all the way from account receivable/payable to Controller-level and all the way up to CFO-level analysis focused on improvement across all financial markers. It’s typically assumed that these strategic services are out of reach for smaller companies because they simply don’t have the luxury of spending that kind of money.

For any small company to be successful, the people, processes, and technology all need to be working like a well-oiled machine. There is much less room for error than typically exists in a larger company. At the end of the day, then, small companies typically have to compete with fewer tools and skills at their disposal, at least as far as accounting goes.

But why can’t the small company get access to the same skills that the larger companies get? Asking this question is how we are oriented at Joy Accounting. We believe that the small guy absolutely should have the same tools as the bigger guys.

If what you need is simply a bookkeeper, we are happy to help. If you are a small business within our area of specialty that truly needs a partner in your small business journey, please contact us!